The “Now Hear This” Podcast Festival in LA

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Podcast

This is a jet-lagged post from the LAX American Airlines lounge waiting for a flight to Dallas. (Every Aussie frequent flyer should fly domestic in the US once in a while to realise how great we have it back home). Yesterday I spent my lay-over at the “Now Hear This” podcast festival in Anaheim. I got to see two of … Read More

The “centaur approach” to technology

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I’ve been thinking a lot about technology lately and how it’s going to impact humans at work. One client of mine is undertaking a strategic look at the future of work (and wondering about the future effects of AI on people and work); at the same time I’m preparing for a workshop in Palo Alto with a tech company that works … Read More

Podcasting the US election

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Podcast

Everyone thought Serial was going to change podcasting forever. I wonder whether actually it will be the 2016 US election. Unlike any other political campaign in the past, most of my news on the US presidential race is coming from podcasts. There are six key podcasts I follow for US politics right now: 538 Elections – Nate Silver’s data journalism … Read More

Amusing ourselves to death – Part two

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This is the second post in a two part series on Neil Postman’s 1985 book “Amusing ourselves to death: public discourse in the age of show business” . The first part is here. This week’s post is also the final in the series on how technology “hijacks our minds” (to quote Google’s Tristan Harris), which I started a few weeks ago. You can … Read More

Amusing ourselves to death – Part one

Nick IngramThinking0 Comments

This is the first of a two part final in a series on how technology “hijacks our minds” (to quote Google’s Tristan Harris). You can read the first post in the series here. The last few posts have looked at: How dopamine acts on our brains every time we get a Facebook like or an email update the same way it acts on … Read More

Overcome information overload by tuning the signal to noise ratio

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Information overload

Two weeks ago I talked about information overload and suggested a model to explain it: The model shows two drivers of information overload: The sheer volume of information hitting you. The narrowing of your “processing funnel” due to the fatigue caused by having to deal with this information. In other words, a vicious circle starts to operate where more and … Read More

The dynamic at the heart of information overload

Nick IngramThinking0 Comments

This is the fourth part in a series on how technology “hijacks our minds” (to quote Google’s Tristan Harris). You can read part one of the series here. The last three blogs have looked at: How dopamine acts on our brains every time we get a Facebook like or an email update the same way it acts on the brain … Read More

How to stay focused by stopping self-interruptions

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Self-interruption

This is the third part in a series on how technology “hijacks our minds” (to quote Google’s Tristan Harris). You can read part one of the series here. The last two blog posts have focused on how technology can distract and interrupt us. We’ve looked at two key mechanisms: The strong reinforcing effects from social media in particular – where Facebook … Read More

We live in an “ecosystem of interruption technologies”

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Interruption

This is the second part in a series on how technology “hijacks our minds” (to quote Google’s Tristan Harris). You can read part one of the series here. Nicholas Carr, in his fantastic 2010 book The Shallows, describes turning on a computer today as plunging into an “ecosystem of interruption technologies” (p91). Today’s computers and mobile devices play on two deeply embedded vulnerabilities … Read More

Why we adore the technologies that undo our capacities to think

Nick IngramThinking0 Comments

Why do we adore the technologies that undo our capacities to think?

A client sent me a great article this week on how technology is intentionally designed to capture our attention, interrupt our work, and consume our time. The article is by Tristan Harris, a Google “Design Ethics and Product Philosopher” (whatever the heck that job is, I mean, really…). Anyway, the article served to crystallise a lot of my recent thinking, … Read More